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SPEED CONTROLLER

Keyfob & Mini Controller for Battery Powered Locomotives

Many radio control systems for model railways are adaptations of traditional Aircraft R/C components and methods, normally based around the use of servos and the continuous stream of pulses needed to control them. For controlling the speed of electric motors, additional circuitry is needed to convert the variable pulse width servo signal into something more appropriate for driving a motor. To allow operation of several systems simultaneously, each Transmitter/Receiver pair must use a different channel frequency, which requires a certain amount of co-ordination and co-operation between the individuals concerned to avoid duplication and its inevitable consequences.

With these conventional systems the Transmitter sends out a continuous signal to the Receiver to maintain the servo positions according to each joystick setting. Fifty times a second or thereabouts, the Transmitter informs each servo exactly where to position itself. This provides instantaneous control at all times, which is clearly essential for aircraft operation where movement of control surfaces is a more or less continuous process just to keep it in the air. As the Transmitter is always transmitting during use, it tends to consume considerable amounts of battery power, most of which is effectively wasted sending redundant information. As a result, Transmitter boxes tend to be relatively large and heavy, normally containing several rechargeable batteries which require charging on a regular basis.

However, when such systems are adapted for use in a model railway environment, especially on layouts with continuous runs, there is little need for continuous control in the same manner. In principle, under most circumstances a locomotive can be simply left to carry on at its current speed until told to do otherwise. This implies a rather different control philosophy whereby it is only necessary to send speed changes to the locomotive. This means that the Transmitter does not need to be on at all times, only activating itself when a change is requested by the user. In this respect the control becomes more akin to a Command Control system where a coded instruction is sent to the Receiver rather than a signal directly representing the speed required. The receiving circuitry remembers the settings as they change without needing to be completely updated every time.

One way to achieve this kind of control is to use inexpensive proprietary low power radio control modules, originally designed for such applications as garage door opening, security entrances etc, where a few button presses on a small pocket sized Keyfob are interpreted to provide the signals necessary for the particular application. These Keyfob based systems typically provide two or three separately switched outputs which can be used to control simple devices such as a locomotive speed controller. Each Keyfob Transmitter has a unique identity, coded into its transmissions, which the associated Receiver module 'learns' as part of system initialisation. This eliminates the problem of channel frequency allocation during normal use as a Receiver will only respond to a Keyfob whose identity it has been 'taught' beforehand.  Any others will be ignored even though they all use the same channel frequency.

The Keyfob and Receiver modules used in the system described here are standard proprietary parts and are available in 2 versions, AM and FM.  FM generally gives a longer range and more reliable reception, but at slightly higher cost. Both types operate in the license free 433 MHz band, set aside for low power remote controls such as these. The manufacturer quotes operational ranges of up to 100 meters for these modules, though this can be affected to some extent by local obstructions and the efficiency of the receiving aerial on the locomotive, so a realistic range would be about 30 - 40 meters. At this frequency the length of a quarter wavelength aerial as originally fitted is approximately 17cm (6.8"), and control can be considered to be effectively line-of-sight.

In addition to motor speed control, the system includes an additional on/off output which can be used to operate, for example, an electromechanical uncoupler based on a relay mechanism.

nitially, the Speed Controller System consisted of three main parts; the Keyfob which has three push buttons, a Receiver module, and a Speed Control module. The Receiver and Speed Control modules were originally connected by a thin multi way cable, but this is now being replaced by a new combined (or integrated) unit, where the receiver module is piggy backed onto the Speed Control module, and the now single module can easily be mounted in any suitable location.

The Speed Control module uses a PIC micro controller to interpret the button presses and control the locomotive functions. Motor speed control is based on a Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) technique, giving high efficiency and low losses, hence increased operating time from the locomotive battery pack. The motor drive device is a low on-resistance H-Bridge device specified for currents up to 2.8 amps. The device is suitable for 10 to 24 volt motors.  Size is just 69 mm x 24 mm, and is 11 mm thick at the widest point.

A 'polyswitch' type resettable fuse is fitted in-line with the positive battery supply to protect against over current conditions.

The Tail Lamp LED is provided and may be trailed to the rear of the locomotive. It is normally illuminated only when the locomotive is moving forwards. It also doubles as a Mode Indicator when 'Learn Mode' is being used.

Ideally, the Receiver would be mounted some distance away from the motor to minimize the chance of interference.  The aerial wire attached to the Receiver is run outside the bodywork. In the original design the receiving aerial was the trickiest aspect to manage as it needs to be inconspicuous, yet located in a position where the signal can be received efficiently, ideally away from metal bodywork. In this respect the optimum position and orientation for the aerial wire is likely to vary from loco to loco.  However, the new combined unit incorporates a special light weight, omni-directional Multi-layer Chip Antenna, measuring just 16 mm x 3 mm x 1.7 mm.  In tests this new Antenna has effectively more than doubled the operating range, from a tiny package that can easily be disguised.

On the Keyfob and Receiver modules, for each 'proper' button press the Keyfob (and Receiver) LED's normally flash twice. Speed is adjusted by pressing the 'Triangle' and 'Circle' Keyfob buttons for Forward and Reverse directions respectively. Each time the button is pressed, the speed increases a step at a time until the maximum is reached. Holding the button down causes the speed to ramp up (or down) at a step rate fixed by the Receiver module. Slowing is achieved by pressing the opposite button, which decreases the speed a step at a time until zero is reached. Continuing to press the same button will then start to increase the speed again, but in the opposite direction. The principle is the same as that of a conventional centre-off speed control knob, where the speed must go through zero in order for the direction to change.

The third red 'Square' button is used as an Emergency Stop (E Stop). Pressing this will cause the speed to be reduced immediately to zero, with the direction setting unchanged.

Pressing the Triangle and Circle buttons simultaneously will toggle the setting of the coupling relay. To prevent uncoupling on the move this will only operate if the locomotive speed is set to zero. After it has been toggled (up or down), the coupling will remain in its existing state until toggled again. This allows the coupling to be raised before approaching the rolling stock, kept raised for the final approach, and then lowered when the loco has stopped at the coupling position. A similar pattern is applied for uncoupling.

Every locomotive responds in its own unique manner to the controls provided, given the wide variations of motor, gearing, mechanism etc.  Several operating parameters can be adjusted or 'Learnt' to optimize the response for a particular locomotive. Generally this optimization process will only need to be performed on the first occasion the loco is operated. By pressing all 3 buttons for about 5 seconds, the Speed Module is sent into learn mode, were the adjusted settings are semi-permanently stored in the Speed Control Module, becoming ready for use immediately each time the locomotive is powered up. These include 1. Minimum speed set up 2. Maximum speed set up 3. Speed Step Resolution (number of steps). 4. Pulse Repetition Frequency (PWM frequency). 5. Emergency Stop Rate. 6. Learn New Keyfob (Maximum 50 Keyfob's).

wanted to keep the original concept of Keyfob Control, but customer requests for improvements/and the limitation of size and available Keyfob buttons has lead us to develop an additional 'Mini Transmitter' measuring just 87 mm x 59 mm x 31 mm, which can still be considered as pocket sized.  A compact (31 mm x 10 mm) helical quarter wavelength aerial is included which tests show greatly increase the transmission range beyond that of the original Keyfob.  The benefits of the new transmitter are that separate buttons are provided for every function, individually labeled, though still in a convenient size and shape for operation with just one hand. The addition of 2 new buttons has given us the opportunity to provide separate button presses for automatic Halt and Resume to the last known speed.  The unit uses readily available AAA batteries, resulting in much longer life than conventional Keyfob batteries, with simple Battery replacement when required.  There is also a space provided on the rear label to write an individual loco name or number.

The essentials of the new Speed Controller module are that it integrates the receiver and controller into one unit, avoiding the need for an interconnecting cable, and making the overall volume smaller.  The unit still retains the built in 'polyswitch' type resettable fuse, but also now includes polarity protection. The toggle coupling relay will now become available as a separate item, as we found most people were not using this function.  The ceramic receiver is protected by the rigidity of the assembly, and is thus less prone to inadvertent damage.  The assembly is completely covered by protective slaving, greatly reducing the chance of loose wires or other conductive materials causing damage by inadvertent contact.

There seems to be an increasing number of railway modellers migrating up from the smaller gauges, and they seem to retain small scale mentality in the controlling of a large scale loco, that 'DCC IS THE ONLY WAY AHEAD', but this is certainly not the case.  In the larger scales it is more the individual locomotive that is modelled.  Onboard miniature radio control can also provide reliable control when combined with Live Steam running, and the beauty of running your loco on other peoples tracks without the need for wheel or track isolation. The great thing about Keyfob units ever since the beginning is that they seem to be totally glitch free, smooth and reliable. The Speed Controller will even fit in this "00" Gauge 'Brown Vehicle' which is connected to any loco via a JST connector located in the corridor connection.

 

There is nothing worse than not having all you need to finish the job, so your Controller comes complete with full detailed instructions and wiring diagram, a laminated Settings Card, and an Accessory Pack with a 2.1 diameter charge socket, toggle type switch, spare hook up wire and heatshrink sleeving. The only things you need are batteries and battery holder.

 

SPECIFICATIONS

Dimensions; Receiver 90 mm (71 mm board size) x 24.5 mm x 12.5 mm (plus 11 mm x 11 mm projection on Continuous Version)
Keyfob 67 mm x 36 mm x 17.5 mm
Mini Tx 117 mm overall (88 mm excluding Antenna) x 59 mm wide x 32 mm
Supply Voltage 8 to 20 volt (16 to 30 volt, high voltage version)
Maximum Currant 2 amp for Standard Version (for shunting & light loads)
Maximum Current 2.8 amp Continuous Version (for continuous running with coaches & wagons)
Built in fuse 0.9A or 1.35A resettable fuse fitted
Accessory Drive Output 5V logic level @10mA max continuous.
Radio Components RF Solutions standard modules.
433MHz FM (or AM optionally). CE Compliant for use in Europe.
License Exemption Europe: The transmitter encoders use ECM compliant radio transmitter modules and comply with ETSI330-220 and ETSI300-683.

 

THE COMPLETE KEYFOB KIT:-

  • An AM or FM Keyfob
  • An AM or FM Receiver with piggy backed Speed Controller module and built in Rainsun Multi layer Chip Antenna Single pole double throw sub-miniature toggle switch and a 2.1 mm battery charge socket.
  • Spare Keyfob battery.
  • Laminated plastic reference 'Settings Card. Full installation instructions with wiring diagram.

 

THE COMPLETE MINI TRANSMITTER KIT:-

  • 1 x AM or FM Mini Transmitter
  • AM or FM Receiver with piggy backed Speed Controller module and built in Rainsun Multi layer Chip Antenna
  • 1 x Single pole double throw sub-miniature toggle switch
  • 1 x 2.1 mm battery charge socket
  • 1 x Laminated plastic reference 'Settings Card'
  • 1 x Full installation instructions
The unit is supplied with a 2.1mm diameter charge socket and with a toggle switch (that's the one on the far left and far right), but you can have the older front mounting 2.1mm or 2.5mm diameter charge socket and/or a slide switch if you prefer.

OPTIONAL EXTRAS:-

  • Spare Keyfob battery
  • Keyfob for dual control
  • Mini Transmitter for dual control
  • Low cost Compact helical coil Antenna
  • Ni-MH Rechargeable Batteries 1100 mAh x AAA or 2600 mAh AA for your loco
 
 

Radio Control System for Servo Operated Live Steam locomotives

 

INTRODUCTION

I have been asked on several occasions to consider the possibility of developing a servo version of our 'Electric' speed controller.  The draw back with radio controlling live steam is trying to accommodate the somewhat bulky conventional component parts in the space available, this has always been best achieved when designed into the original loco, and retro fitting of radio control is harder still. The new radio control unit and batteries are small enough to fit under the coal load of a Tender loco or underneath between the frames. The unit measures just 68mm x 23mm x 10mm, and is sealed to protect against water and fuel. Radio control systems for live steam locomotives traditionally employ standard Aircraft R/C components and methods, based around the use of servos as actuators. To allow operation of several systems simultaneously, each Transmitter/Receiver pair must use a different channel frequency, which requires a certain amount of co-ordination and co-operation between the individuals concerned to avoid accidents. With these conventional systems the Transmitter sends out a continuous signal to the Receiver to maintain the servo positions according to each joystick setting. About fifty times a second the Transmitter informs each servo exactly where to position itself and provides instantaneous control at all times, which is clearly essential for aircraft operation where movement of control surfaces is a more or less continuous process just to keep it in the air. As the Transmitter is always tranmitting during use, it tends to consume considerable amounts of battery power, most of which is effectively wasted sending redundant information. As a result, Transmitter boxes tend to be relatively large and heavy, normally containing several batteries which require recharging or replacing on a regular basis . However, when such systems are adapted for use in a model railway environment, especially on layouts with continuous runs, there is little need for continuous control in the same manner. In principle, under most circumstances a locomotive can be simply left to carry on at its current speed until told to do otherwise. This implies a rather different control philosophy can be applied whereby it is only necessary to send speed changes to the locomotive. This means that the Transmitter does not need to be on at all times, only activating itself when a change is requested by the user. In this respect the control becomes more akin to a Command Control system where a coded instruction is sent to the Receiver rather than a signal directly representing the speed required. The receiving circuitry remembers the settings as they change without needing to be completely updated every time. One way to achieve this kind of control is to use inexpensive low power radio control modules, originally designed for such applications as garage door opening, security entrances etc, where a few button presses on a small pocket sized Keyfob are interpreted to provide the signals necessary for the particular application. These Keyfob based systems typically provide two or three separately switched outputs which could be used to control simple devices such as a locomotive controller. Each Keyfob Transmitter has a unique identity, coded into its transmissions, which the associated Receiver module 'learns' as part of system initialization. This eliminates the problem of channel frequency allocation during use as a Receiver will only respond to a Transmitter whose identity it has been 'taught' beforehand.  Any others will be ignored even though they are all using the same frequency.It is a system like this which is described here, which builds on the success of the existing Battery Electric Speed Controller for electrically powered locos. Experience with these since their introduction has shown that considerable benefits can be obtained by re-housing the Keyfob components into a more user-friendly 'Mini Transmitter' (or 'Mini Tx') design, somewhat larger than the original Keyfob though still comfortably hand held, with greatly increased range, battery life and simplicity of operation. However, operation with the original three-button Keyfob remains possible, but in some cases will entail pressing more than one button simultaneously. On the servo version of the controller, it is the Blower functions and Halt/Resume that utilize the dual-button 'combinational' presses. Their operation with the Mini Tx is greatly simplified by having a separate button for each of the six possible combinations of one or two buttons.

THE SYSTEM

The Servo Controller System consists of two main parts:- 1) The 'Mini Tx', which has six push buttons, Gray = Halt/Resume, Red = Stop, Black = Blower Decrease (or Reverser), White = Blower Increase (or Reverser), Yellow = Regulator Decrease, Green = Regulator Increase.  2) The combined 'Receiver/Control Module' which uses a PIC micro controller to interpret button presses sent from the Mini Tx and controls the locomotive functions accordingly.  Two servo channels are provided, one for Regulator control and one for Blower control, though each channel can be used for other purposes if so desired. Control is of the form 'Increase' or 'Decrease' for each channel independently, with a separate 'Stop' button to bring both channels to their zero settings immediately.  For each channel, a number of parameters can be defined and stored, using what is known as 'Learn Mode'. These include Minimum and Maximum (end stop) positions, a Blower 'Cracked' position, size of each servo step, etc. Generally, this Learning process will only need to be gone through once for a Loco, though minor adjustments for optimization of control may prove necessary after some operational experience.

CONNECTION

The Receiver/Control module features a number of flying leads, wired ready for use, these are:-1) An LED indicator, which has been made to look like a tail lamp, is used to indicate activity during radio transmissions and when setting up the system in Learn Mode.  If you do not want to use as tail lamp, it could be placed in the cab or disguised in the coal load.2) Two standard Futaba three pin servo connector leads, into which the servos themselves are plugged.3) A standard twoo pin male JST battery connector provides a power input for a 6V or 7.2V Battery pack.  The battery pack supplied has a built in on/off switch and has simply to be soldered to the 2 pin female JST connector lead supplied, placing a piece of heatshrink tube over the wires before soldering.  Alternatively a separate switch can be incorporated, by cutting the red + supply lead and soldering one end to the centre tag and the other end to either of the outer tags.  The battery pack supplied uses 4 x AAA 1.5V non-rechargeable batteries.  An alternative arrangement could also be made using 5 x 1.2V re-chargeable batteries (not supplied).4) Another two pin female JST connector allows for an emergency 'pull' connection to be incorporated as a safety measure, akin to the communication cord historically used on real railways.5) A coaxial Antenna lead, which can be routed to a suitable external location on the Loco for best reception.  The Antenna wire can be shortened if desired by carefully removing the heatshrink tube and un-soldering the 'Rainsun Chip', when reattaching only the centre wire should contact the Rainsun Antenna on the end marked with a red dot, and use a minimum quick soldering heat.  You can bend the coax wire to another angle if desired and the outer heatshrink does not need to be replaced, so a slightly smaller profile can be made, use a felt marker to disguise.  You could also use a very short piece of heatshrink, just enough to cover the joint.

NORMAL OPERATION

Servo positions are adjusted by pressing the 'Increase' or 'Decrease' Mini Tx buttons for each channel. Each time a button is pressed, the prescribed servo moves a step at a time until the maximum (or minimum) position is reached.  Holding a button down causes the position to ramp up (or down) at a set rate.  Servo control occupies the four bottom Mini Tx buttons.  The red LED tail lamp flashes during operation . A fifth Red button is used to command 'Stop'. Pressing this will cause the Regulator servo to move immediately to its defined zero position, and if selected, the Blower servo to move to the 'Blower Crack' position at the same time.The sixth button applies to the 'Halt and Resume' function. This allows a Loco already running (i.e. not at zero) at a set speed to be brought to a 'Halt' on the Regulator in a set time with a single button press. If you are uncertain that the command was received the Halt button can be repeat pressed any number of times, but once the minimum regulator position is reached (even if the loco is still moving), pressing the same button again will 'Resume' the Loco back up to the original speed setting.  A 'Halt' or 'Resume' already in progress can be stopped by pressing either of the Regulator Increase/Decrease (Green/Yellow) buttons before completion. The main use for this feature is for station stops, and practice may be required to use it to its best effect. Three time periods are selectable from 'Learn mode 12', these are:- ASAP, 3 seconds, 6 seconds (Timings are approximate). If the Blower Crack lock is set (Learn mode 8), the blower will adopt a cracked position when Halt reaches zero, and will close again when Resume reaches the last remembered speed.

CHOOSING THE BEST SETTINGS

As supplied, the servo stop positions are pre-defined to be located symmetrically around the nominal centre of servo motion, with a relatively limited swing angle. During installation, the servo arms (or 'horns') should be removed, and the System powered up to ensure the servos are at their initial positions, near to the centre of travel. Thereafter, the arms and linkage can be fitted, with the control valves also set to their approximate central positions for the time being. The eventual servo Maximum and Minimum stop positions are essentially predetermined by the mechanics of the valve levers and linkages to them from the servo arms.  As such, there is no 'best' setting for these, other than ensuring that the span of operation matches the ability of the servo to rotate through that range of motion.It is anticipated that the User will already be reasonably familiar with the lever positions required, having operated the Loco manually beforehand.  There is no reverse direction to the servo movement as such; you just set the minimum and maximum to the opposite ends.  With the Maximum and Minimum positions defined, Step Size can be set to the User's preference.  This might be typically somewhere between four and ten steps. The exact number of steps available will be determined by how many steps of the chosen size fit between the stop positions.

'LEARN MODE'

Each locomotive is likely to respond in its own unique manner to the controls provided, given the wide variations of mechanism and valve lever motions typically used. Because of this, several operating parameters can be adjusted or 'Learnt' to optimizer the response for a particular locomotive.  Generally this optimization process will only need to be performed on the first occasion the loco is operated.  The adjusted settings are permanently stored in the Receiver/Control Module, becoming ready for use immediately each time the locomotive is powered up. Learn Mode is entered by pressing and holding the 'Halt/Resume' and 'Stop' buttons simultaneously for several seconds, until the Tail Lamp red LED and on-board Mode Indicator red LED start to flash.  Note; there is a different on-board green LED to that which flashes to indicate normal Receiver activity. The Tail Lamp LED simply duplicates the Mode Indicator during Learn Mode, for convenient external viewing.  Reference to one or the other in the descriptions below applies to both equally . Whilst in Learn mode, the Tail Lamp LED will flash in a set pattern, depending on the position in the Learn sequence.  For each of the parameters listed below, the LED will flash the number of times prescribed by the paragraph number, i.e. when the red LED flashes just once - it is the Regulator Minimum Position parameter which is being established. Two flashes - Regulator Maximum Position, etc. The flashing pattern is performed cyclically to give a continuous indication with a clear gap between cycles.  If you are unsure what parameter is being set at any time, wait for the next flash cycle to complete.  There is no time limit in 'Learn Mode', so there is no need to hurry.  If you make a mistake, just turn the Receiver off, then on again, and go back into 'Learn Mode'.For each parameter, the Regulator 'Increase' and 'Decrease' (Green & Yellow) buttons are used to increment or decrement the setting until the desired value is reached.  Note; this also applies when adjusting the Blower channel, when in Learn Mode only. Having selected the desired setting, the red 'Stop' button is pressed to store the new setting and move on to the next parameter.  If any parameter does not require changing, it is skipped by pressing the 'Stop' button without touching any other buttons.

1 Regulator Minimum Position. The zero position for the Regulator control lever (Regulator fully closed).  Use the 'Green' and 'Yellow' buttons to adjust.

2 Regulator Maximum Position. The 'full on' position for the Regulator control lever (Regulator fully open).  Use the 'Green' and 'Yellow' buttons to adjust.

3 Regulator Step Size. Selects the angle through which the Regulator servo moves for each button press. When choosing the Step Size setting for either channel, the effect of the newly selected Step Size can be shown by pressing the 'Black' and 'White' buttons, bearing in mind that the Maximum and Minimum settings will prevent movement outside of the allowed range.  Each Step Size setting is twice (or half) the next one.

4 Blower (Reverser) Minimum Position. The zero position for the Blower control lever (Blower fully closed).  Use the 'Green' and 'Yellow' buttons to adjust.

5 Blower (Reverser) Maximum Position. The 'full on' position for the Blower control lever (Blower fully open).  Use the 'Green' and 'Yellow' buttons to adjust.

6 Blower (Reverser) Step Size. Selects the angle through which the Blower servo moves for each button press.  Remember to use the 'Green' and 'Yellow' buttons to adjust, and if you want to check the effect, then use the 'Black' & 'White' buttons.

7 Learn New Transmitter. As supplied, the Mini Tx and Receiver/Control module are matched to work as a unique pair.  The 'Learn New Transmitter' feature allows additional Mini Transmitters (or the original Keyfob) to be recognized by the same Receiver.  Up to 50 Transmitters can be learnt and remembered by a Receiver. To learn a new transmitter, press the 'Green' button once, this will put the Receiver into its own special mode; which starts by illuminating the Receiver Activity green LED continuously (not the Speed Controller or Tail Lamp red LED's, which continue to indicate the Learn mode number).  After this, press the 'Green' button (Triangle on a Keyfob) on the NEW Transmitter to be learnt, this will cause the Receiver green LED to go out. Now press the NEW transmitter 'Green' button again, which will cause the Receiver green LED to flash several times, indicating that the new Mini Tx (or Keyfob) has been successfully recognized.

8 Blower Crack Lock or Neutral Enabled in Reverser Mode. This selects whether or not the Blower servo will adopt the 'Cracked' position automatically when a 'Stop; command is sent. Setting is 'On' or 'Off'. To select the Blower Crack Interlock setting, press the 'Green' button to switch the interlock 'Off', or 'Yellow' button to switch the interlock 'On'.  The default is 'On'.If you have chosen to use this channel as a 'Reverser' mode (see Learn mode 11), to have the Neutral enabled press the 'Yellow' button, to disable press 'Green' button.  The Default is 'Neutral Enabled'.

9 Blower Crack Position or Neutral Position in Reverser Mode. The 'Cracked' position for the Blower control lever, used if the interlock is On.  If in Reverser mode use the same buttons to adjust the 'Neutral' position.  Use the 'Green' and 'Yellow' buttons to adjust.

10 Restore Default Settings. If the User loses track of what settings have been applied, the Receiver/Control module can have the settings for each parameter restored to factory defaults.  Press the 'Green' or 'Yellow' button once to reset.  You may be advised to remove the servo links first.

11 Blower or Reverser mode. Press the 'Green' button to select 'Blower mode' and 'Yellow' button to select 'Reverser mode', to operate a Forward/Reverse lever, or any other function other than a blower.  'Blower' mode is where the Blower Increase/Decrease (White & Black) buttons move the servo normally at the resolution set in Learn mode 6.   'Reverser' mode is where the White button selects the servo to move fully in one direction and the Black button selects the opposite direction, you can choose which button is 'Forward' and which is 'Reverse'.  The optional 'Neutral' position can be selected, see Learn mode 8. The servo 'position' for neutral is defined using Learn mode 9.  When at speed (i.e. not zero), the Reverser buttons will be ignored to prevent inadvertent operation.  To change Reverser direction, use the White/Black buttons when stationary.  If neutral option is enabled, the first press of the White or Black button moves the servo to the neutral position, and the second press of the same button moves the servo in the same direction.  Whilst at the neutral position, pressing either White or Black will move directly to the desired direction.  The default is 'Blower' mode.

12 Halt/Resume period. There are three selectable times:- ASAP, 3 seconds, 6 seconds (Timings are approximate).  Use the 'Green' button to decrease the period, 'Yellow' button to increase the period.  The Default is 3 seconds. 

When all parameters have been adjusted (or skipped) and saved, the Mode red LED stops its flashing sequence, the Tail Lamp returns to a constant 'On' and the module resumes normal operation.  It is recommended that the User practices using Learn Mode prior to making any changes to get a feel for button press timing.  If the button is held too long, a double (or more) skip may result.  However, it is always possible to go around the sequence again if a setting is inadvertently missed out. The LED flash number is always available to indicate which parameter is currently being set.  It is advisable to wait until just after the end of a flashing sequence before pressing the 'Stop' button to move on to the next parameter, this avoids confusion over the flash count.
The 'Standard Accessory Pack is included in the price. The unit is supplied with an AAA switched battery pack, but you can have an AA switched or un-switched battery pack if you wish (no extra charge). The unit is supplied with a toggle switch, but you can have a slide switch if you prefer (no extra charge).
 

ADDITIONAL RECEIVER

It is now possible to add an additional Receiver to an existing Keyfob or Mini Transmitter System for either electric or servo versions. Obviously if both locomotives are switched on and both are within range of the Transmitter, both will operate. There may therefore be advantages in using the more limited range of a Keyfob in this situation. And double heading of locomotives would also be possible provided the both locomotives are of a similar setup.You will need to "Self Program" your Receiver with the "Pin wire" provided. The Additional Receiver comes with the 'Standard Accessory Pack' unless you specify otherwise.

ACCESSORIES

 

Low cost Compact helical coil Antenna

Spare Keyfob battery

Project board 50mm x 80mm

Rainsun multi layer chip Antenna with heatshrink tube

(does not come with the 50p!!)

Ni-MH Rechargeable Batteries either 1100 mAh AAA or 2600 mAh AA for your loco

PP3 Battery Clip

HUMP BATTERY

6 volt hump battery for Servo Controller. Fitted with male JST connector. Size:- 50.5mm long x 29.5mm wide x 32 high.

UNCOUPLER UNIT

This is an uncoupler unit for use with the Electric Speed Controller.  Plugs into the Auxiliary Output.

METAL GEAR SERVO

Dimensions: 23 x 12.2 x 29mm
Operating Speed (4.8V no load): 0.11sec / 60 degrees
Operating Speed (6.0V no load): 0.10sec / 60 degrees
Stall Torque (4.8V): 2.2 kg/cm
Stall Torque (6.0V): 2.5 kg/cm
Temperature Range: - 30 to + 60 degree C
Dead Band Width: 10us
Operation Voltage: 4.8 - 6.0 Volts
Operation Voltage: 4.8 - 6.0 Volts

STEAM OR DIESEL SOUND UNIT

A low cost and customisable sound card for steam or diesel locos. One third the cost of the major sound card brands and its small size for easy fitting is only 64mm by 38mm. The digital synthesized sound varies correctly with loco speed. Customisable using a screwdriver with no programming needed. Suitable for PWM battery or track powered locos and some DCC. Steam sound is not an inflexible recording of a real steam loco, but a synthesized sound which is highly adjustable to represent a variety of steam locos, from small shunter and industrial locos up to heavy, mainline freight engines. Adjustment is easy; you just need a small screwdriver to adjust the controls. This will give you 1) Whistle (or horn) volume 2) Whistle (or horn) tone, 3) Chuff (engine) volume, 4) Chuff (engine) rate at top speed and proportion to the speed of the loco, 5) Chuff (Engine) rate when the loco is static, 6) Static steam hiss. The kit comes with an 8 ohm x 57mm diameter loudspeaker (27mm can also be used). The soundcard requires a minimum of 7 volts to operate. Plugs into the Auxiliary Output.

300/600mA SMART CHARGER

Charges 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 cell NiCd or Ni-MH battery packs (2.4V, 4.8V, 6.0V, 7.2V, 8.4V, 9.6V, 12V)
Delta-Peak microprocessor controlled charging, switches to trickle charge once pack is charged.  Discharge function for NiCd battery packs.
300mA or 600mA selectable charging current
Mains 230V UK 3-pin plug, 2.1mm charge lead, Tamiya lead, crocodile clip charge lead.

Super quality 10 to 20 cell fully automatic chargers. Output 41 volt, fast charge at 1.8 amp, top off charge at 250ma then a 60ma trickle charge.

Fitted with a 2.1mm charge plug.

These are made in Norway and not China, and are very good quality.

 

BATTERY HOLDERS

I have various battery holders for use with the Speed Controllers

1 x AA cell

2 x AA cell

4 x AA cell

6 x AA cell

10 x AA cell

4 x AA cell boxed